Assistive Technology Accommodations

Assistive Technology Accommodations

Assistive technology is technology used by individuals with disabilities in order to perform functions that might otherwise be difficult or impossible. Assistive technology can include mobility devices such as walkers and wheelchairs, as well as hardware and software that assist people with disabilities in accessing computers or other information technologies. For example, people with limited hand function may use a keyboard with large keys or a special mouse to operate a computer, people who are blind may use software that reads text on the screen in a computer-generated voice, people with low vision may use software that enlarges screen content, people who are deaf may use a TTY (text telephone), or people with speech impairments may use a device that speaks out loud as they enter text via a keyboard (University of Washington Do-It Program)

What Accommodations do I Need?

To determine what accommodations you need, it is important to clearly understand your disability (strengths and weaknesses), find accommodation solutions that match to your weak areas, and explore technology and other accommodation solutions that may boost your weak areas. Use the Accommodation Worksheet as a guide to identifying your accommodations. Activity #1: Complete the Accommodation Worksheet to identify current and potential accommodations

  • Areas of Strengths & Weaknesses - Your strengths and weaknesses have already been identified in your evaluation report and/or your Individualized Assessment Plan. You also gained a better understanding of your disability and how it affects you in the classroom during the Self-Determination learning module. Use the information you already learned to list your areas of weakness on the Accommodation Worksheet. Example: slow reader, don’t understand what I read, difficulty doing math calculations, can’t turn the pages of my books, etc.
  • Current Accommodations - Check the box next to the accommodations you are currently receiving. Try to understand the connection between a listed weakness and a specific accommodation. For example, a slow reader might have extended time on tests and books in a digital or audio format.
  • Assistive Technology Accommodations - Mark the Assistive technology accommodations you are already using. Many students are unaware of the technologies that can help you accomplish learning. For example: if you have problems with writing, a speech-to text computer program such as Dragon would allow you to say aloud into a microphone what you want written and the computer will translate your words into print.
  • New Potential Accommodations - Write in new accommodations you believe you need. Remember to match your accommodation to a listed weakness. It might be nice to have books in an audio or digital format but if you do not have a disability related need for this accommodation, do not list it on your worksheet. Also include assistive technologies as possible new accommodations. You may also want to complete the BreakThru Assistive Technology module either on your own or with your mentor to learn more about technology accommodations.